Honor Brabazon

 

Brabazon Crim Profile Pic (2)

Honor Brabazon
BA (Hons.) (Trinity, Toronto), MA (York), DPhil (Oxford)

Assistant Professor
h.brabazon@utoronto.ca

 

Professor Brabazon’s research is concerned with the nature and role of law in the neoliberal period, particularly in relation to reconfigurations of public debate and dissent. She uses empirical research conducted in Bolivia, Sweden, the US, India, and Canada to explore and theorize shifting conditions and strategies of social change, including the criminalization of dissent, new approaches to law by social movements, and broader theoretical questions about the transformative potential of law.

Recent and Forthcoming Publications

Brabazon, Honor. ‘The Master’s Tools’: The Possibilities and Perils of Law-Based Resistance to Neoliberalism. Manuscript in progress.

Brabazon, Honor, ed. Neoliberal Legality: The Constitutive Role of Law in the Neoliberal Project. Manuscript in progress.

Brabazon, Honor. “‘Les Carrés Rouges contre la loi’: Understanding the Creative Use of Law by the Quebec Student Protests.” Submitted for publication.

Brabazon, Honor and Kirsten Kozolanka. “More Communication, Less Debate: ‘Photo-Op Democracy’ and Changes to Legislative and Parliamentary Norms as a Communication Strategy of the Harper Government.” Submitted for publication.

Brabazon, Honor. “Occupying Legality: The Subversive Use of Law in Latin American Occupation Movements.” Bulletin for Latin American Research Special Issue: Rethinking Social Emancipation: Social Movements in XXI Century Latin America, forthcoming, 2015.

Brabazon, Honor and Jeffery R. Webber. “Evo Morales and the MST in Bolivia: Continuities and Discontinuities in Agrarian Reform.” Journal of Agrarian Change, 2014, 14(3): 435-465.

Brabazon, Honor. Book review of Mobilizing Bolivia’s Displaced: Indigenous Politics and the Struggle Over Land, by Nicole Fabricant. (Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 2012.) Journal of Agrarian Change, 2014, 14(4): 598-601.

Brabazon, Honor. “Mothers of the Global Welfare State: How Neoliberal Globalization Affects Working Mothers in Sweden and Canada.” In 21st Century Motherhood. Ed. Andrea O’Reilly. New York: Columbia University Press, 2010. 199-215.

Brabazon, Honor. “The Criminalization of Dissent: Canada’s Answers to Terrorism Then and Now.” York Centre for International and Security Studies, York University, Toronto. Working Paper 43, 2006.

Brabazon, Honor, Peter Brogan, and William I. Robinson. “Latin America, State Power, and the Challenge to Global Capital: An Interview with William Robinson.” Orfalea Center for Global & International Studies, University of California, Santa Barbara. Working Paper 42, 2006. Reprinted five times in English: in Left Turn Magazine (leftturn.org); Upping the Anti (Issue 3); Focus on the Global South (focusweb.org); Pragoti: Progress and Struggle (m.pragoti.in/bn); and America Latina en Movimiento (alainet.org). Translated into Spanish and reprinted as “America Latina, Poder Estatal y Oposición al Capital Global: Una Entrevista con William I. Robinson” in Focus on the Global South (focusweb.org).

Brabazon, Honor. “Development as Resistance: An Examination of the Impact of Development on Globalization.” Undercurrent, Fall/Winter 2004: 21-35.

 

Ongoing and Future Research

Professor Brabazon’s ongoing and future research includes the following:

An edited volume on Neoliberal Legality, which theorizes the relationship between law and neoliberalism.

A book manuscript on the transformative potential of law in the neoliberal period

Coordination of a collaborative book project on Law’s Hegemony, which explores law’s supremacy over alternative systems of authority. The project has received funding from Harvard Law School’s Institute for Global Law and Policy.

Research on the UK student occupation movement and US Occupy movement for a theorization of “Juridification, Technocratisation, and Strategies of Dissent in the Neoliberal Political Sphere”, which is part of the UK Economic and Social Research Council-funded project, The Public Life of Private Law.

A new research project exploring the interplay among diverse tactics of the Black Lives Matter movement.

 

Courses Taught

Introduction to Sociolegal Studies

Neighbourhoods and Crime

Comparative Criminal Justice

Current Issues in Criminal Law